Workshops and E-symposia to kick off the New Year

We have 2 Geosciences Technology Workshops and 3 E-symposia starting up right after the New Year. Have you signed up yet?

 

New Directions in Carbonates

27-29 February 2012 | Fort Worth, Texas

New enhanced drilling techniques (geosteering in horizontal wells) combined with new technologies and a better understanding of how to economically produced hydrocarbons in carbonates have revitalized exploration for and development of carbonate reservoirs.
Presentations will discuss different types of porosity, and the processes that both enhance and inhibit reservoir productivity. In addition, permeability issues are also addressed, and the new technologies and techniques that allow a closer and more detailed analysis of both permeability and porosity, with careful attention paid to drilling fluids and completions (including hydraulic fracturing and waterfloods).
Join us to learn and discuss new and revitalized plays, new technologies, and case studies / experiences involving the Mississippian in Oklahoma and Kansas, the Permian Basin, new carbonates in the Texas Panhandle and North Texas, and more. The workshop crosses the disciplines and features presentations involving engineering, geology, and geophysics.

Basic Structure of the Event

Section 1
What are the “new carbonates”?
Section 2
Geological Contexts and Settings for the “New Carbonates”
Section 3
3D seismic and other geophysical insights & workflows
Section 4
Porosity and permeability / Determining “sweet spots” / well logs (while drilling & then developing offsets)
Section 5
Reservoir characterization / case studies
Section 6
Drilling considerations (drilling fluids / geosteering / etc — taking an integrated approach)
Section 7
Completions: Geological considerations (hydraulic fracturing, proppant diagenesis, etc.)
Section 8
Future directions / Ongoing reservoir development / EOR / re-fracing /

 

 

The Eagle Ford Play: Integrated Technology Approaches to Exploration and Production

26-28 March 2012 | San Antonio, Texas

While known for years to contain oil and gas, Eagle Ford shale in South Texas has recently come into its own due to the advent of new technology, which allow explorationists to identify and drill for productive zones, and to economically recover the hydrocarbons.
Join us for an interdisciplinary workshop that focuses on the exploration and production life cycle of an Eagle Ford unit or field.
We will start by defining the Eagle Ford through its geochemical, geological, and geophysical profiles. We will then take a look at the geological framework, including basin analysis to gain an understanding of the depositional environment, and the regimes that influence structure and stratigraphy.
The presentations will include a discussion of determining where to drill using old and new seismic (including full azimuth seismic), how to determine sweet spots, and which well logs to run and how to reevaluate old ones.
Reservoir characterization as it applies to case studies and field development will be examined, and there will be presentations on how to optimize drilling and completion operations, including considerations of drilling fluids, geosteering, hydraulic fracturing, proppant selection, frac fluid selection, and geomechanical considerations. We will conclude by examining future directions, with a view to field development, refracing operations, enhanced oil recovery, and stimulation.

Basic Structure of the Event

Section 1
What is the Eagle Ford? (geochemical / geological definitions / profiles
Section 2
Geological Contexts and Settings for the Eagle Ford
Section 3
3D seismic and other geophysical insights & workflows (determining where to drill)
Section 4
Porosity and permeability / Determining “sweet spots” / well logs (while drilling & then developing offsets)
Section 5
Reservoir characterization / case studies
Section 6
Drilling considerations (drilling fluids / geosteering / etc — taking an integrated approach)
Section 7
Completions: Geological considerations (hydraulic fracturing, proppant diagenesis, etc.)
Section 8
Future directions / Ongoing reservoir development / EOR / re-fracing /

 

 

Eagle Ford Shale Prospecting with 3D Seismic Data within a Tectonic and Depositional System Framework – An AAPG E-Symposium

INSTRUCTOR:
Galen Treadgold, Weinman Geoscience, Dallas, TX
DATES:
January 20, 2012

Description

The Eagle Ford Shale in South Texas is one of the more exciting shale plays in the United States at the current time. Recently published reports of well tests describe gas well rates exceeding 17 mmcf/d and oil well rates in excess of 1500 bopd and unconfirmed rates of 2000 bopd. Acreage lease rates continue to climb as more positive results come from drilling within the trend. A key issue for the exploration companies is finding where to focus acreage acquisition and optimize drilling plans for optimal gas and oil recovery. Our paper will first consider the geologic context of the Eagle Ford and then look at geophysical techniques, in particular, comparing and contrasting the value of 3D Processing seismic attributes in building a successful exploration plan.
Conventional subsurface data, such as wireline logs, cores and cuttings, are limited in availability to many companies currently exploring the play. Interpretation of these data is often ambiguous at best. As a result, thorough understanding of the regional aspects of the play remains elusive to many companies. It is our belief that modern seismic data and interpretation techniques can add significantly to the database and greatly enhance regional understanding of the play for many companies. Newly acquired 3D datasets provide a continuous characterization of the subsurface, which highlights drilling hazards (faults), and also offers the potential for identifying better reservoir quality intervals (higher TOC shale sections with greater porosity and fractures). Extracting rock properties from the seismic should be the goal of any processing and interpretation effort. Linking the results of well tests to the attributes derived from the seismic will provide operators with a far more reliable predictive capability in any shale play.

Ultimately, the pursuit of Eagle Ford acreage and the designing of an Eagle Ford drilling campaign is best accomplished through a comprehensive understanding of the geologic framework coupled with a focused interpretation of the seismic. This shale is one of the more exciting domestic shale plays, and presents ample opportunities to make and lose money. The smart operator will utilize all the tools available to study the target section while recognizing the limitations of the technology.

Key Topics will include:

• Seismic data
• Heterogeneities in the Eagle Ford
• Isochron and Isopach maps
• Coherence and curvature attributes
• Lineaments associated with small-throw faults and possible fracture trends
• Seismic data offer a number of opportunities to understand potential heterogeneities in the Eagle Ford
• Amplitude variation implications
• Full azimuth data
• Long offsets
• High frequency / High fold data

 

 

Seismic Reservoir Characterization of U.S. Shales: An Update – An AAPG E-Symposium

INSTRUCTOR:
David Paddock, Schlumberger, Houston, TX
DATES:
February 9, 2012

Description

Insights and lessons from seismic to simulation projects as well as more numerous seismic reservoir characterization projects have revealed both variety and commonality in seismically-detectable drivers for success. Throughout these projects, we have seen in the last year the importance of stress and pre-existing fractures as well as the ongoing confirmation that reservoir quality is key in many shales. Projects in several shales will be discussed, including Marcellus, Eagle Ford, Haynesville, Fayetteville, Montney, and Barnett, as will several seismically-detectable drivers for success including lithofacies, stress, pre-existing fractures, and pore pressure.

 

 

Continuous Fracture Modeling: Predicting Location of Fractures – An AAPG E-Symposium

INSTRUCTOR:
Ahmed Ouenes, Sigma3, Greenwood Village, CO
DATES:
February 16, 2012

Description

This e-symposium will review the nature of fracture systems and their impact on reservoir quality and ultimate recoverable reserves. The types of fracture systems will be reviewed with the goal of discussing ways to measure, model, and predict fractures and fracture systems.
 

Case studies will be presented that cover the following:
• Complex natural fracture systems (Maloichskoe field / West Siberian basin case)
• Fractured carbonates, with low matrix flow properties
• Orientation of fractures: prediction / determination
• Location of fractures: prediction / determination / decision-making (drilling / stimulation)
• Density of fractures
• Decision-making using fracture modeling / prediction:
 Drilling locations
 Drilling fluids
 Stimulation
• Reservoir Modeling / characterization

Structure of the E-Symposia
Each e-symposium consists of one-hour live e-symposium, along with material for one full day of independent study. The live portion will be followed by a full day of independent study (not a live event). The one-hour live e-symposium can be accessed from any computer anywhere in the world using a high-speed internet connection. After the event is over, you will receive via email information about accessing the asynchronous segment (not live) which consists of your independent study materials, to be accessed and studied at any time. You will be able to email responses to the readings, along with your study question answers for CEU credit (if you sign up for the extended package).

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